Upcoming midterms in New York & West Virginia give glimpse of rural politics in 2018 (Daily Yonder)

I’m writing a series of previews of congressional midterm elections for the Daily Yonder, a website about rural America published by the Center for Rural Strategies out of Whitesburg, Kentucky.

“Rural” as measured by the US Census—which is based not on geography but what percentage of a population is living in metro vs non-metro areas.

My first story focused on upstate New York, home to two of the 20 most rural districts in the US. This story looks at developing midterm races in NY-19 (a toss-up) and NY-21 (safe R). Read it at the Daily Yonder here.

The second story looks at West Virginia’s 3rd congressional district, which Donald Trump won by 50 points but which is an open seat with unpredictable dynamics. Read that story here.

Legislation to add bikes to federal wilderness threatens to crack conservation coalition (Blue Ridge Outdoors)

A bill to allow mountain bikes in federal wilderness areas appears stalled in the House, & would seem to be DOA in the Senate anyway. Still, this story is important for what it signifies in the conservation coalition.

At 1st blush, this may seem simple. The Wilderness Act is a bedrock environmental law in the US, & preserving wilderness is important. & yet, I had not thought about how wilderness is regularly added by Congress, & what that means for areas once home to well-used bike trails.

I break that dynamic down a bit in this story through the example of Dolly Sods in WV. Expansion of that wilderness a few years ago was trumpeted as a major victory, but it also involved a breakdown between mountain bikers & wilderness advocates.

Politics & personalities ultimately contributed to the final outcome, & there is still bad blood today over how it went down. That’s the real danger of HR 1349—that it may splinter the coalition between recreationalists & wilderness groups.

My story in Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine digs into that dynamic, with voices from across the spectrum. Check it out in April’s issue or read it online here.

Schools, snow days & hungry students (Scalawag)

“I was working really late in my office on a Thursday night, and we had been closed for four days for snow, when my phone rang and this little boy said, ‘Lady are you going to open school tomorrow?’ I said, ‘I really don’t know, honey, but I’m going to make the call and it will be on television.’ He replied, ‘Please open. I am SO hungry.’ It was life-changing for me.”

👆 That’s Roanoke School Superintendent Rita Bishop talking about what goes into the decision to call off school for snow and other inclement weather. It’s a reason why city schools began opening cafeterias to students & their parents three years ago.

Buoyed by a USDA memo, other western Virginia school systems have increasingly been doing the same, including here in Floyd County, which twice this academic year have opened their cafeterias to the community on snowy days.

Read my story about that + how schools and non-profit organizations are increasingly partnering to feed children in economically distressed communities, at Scalawag Magazine.

Don Blankenship has turned WV’s Republican primary for U.S. Senate into a 3-way race (New Republic)

When he first entered the West Virginia Republican primary for U.S. Senate, I kind of wrote off Don Blankenship’s campaign as an effort at rehabbing his image after a year in prison. But now, five weeks out from the primary election, it appears that the former apex predator of blood capitalism is in the hunt.

Read my story about Blankenship’s background & the current moment at The New Republic.

How Appalachian black metal is defining a new era of mountain music (Noisey)

The music of the rising Appalachian black metal scene is awesome, & the musicians behind it are extraordinarily thoughtful individuals, so I always jump at the chance to talk to them.

This story features Slaves BC, Ulfrinn, Twilight Fauna, Nechochwen, and Vials of Wrath.

I recommended more artists here:

 

Read my story at Noisey.

From moshpits to condos and back: Salem Avenue’s transformation (Between Coasts)

At Between Coasts I wrote about how a stretch of Roanoke’s Salem Ave went from moshpits to townhouses and back again.

This story features a little more autobiography than most of my writing, as well as skaters from Twin Valleys Roller Derby + derby photos by Stephen Lowery/Kluster Flux + vintage punk pics by Kent Moore Photography.

Read it at Between Coasts.

Don Blankenship’s entry into the GOP US Senate campaign scrambles the race (Blue Ridge Outdoors)

The 2018 GOP primary for West Virginia’s US Senate seat was turning into another Mitch McConnell/Steve Bannon proxy fight. Then one of the most hated men in West Virginia announced his candidacy.

I think Don Blankenship is using this mostly to grind his ax against MSHA, incumbent US Sen Joe Manchin & the federal government. Even so, he’s injecting a unpredictable element of chaos into what had been a seemingly straight-forward primary.

Read the story at Blue Ridge Outdoors.

Virginia Tech alumni winning in roller derby & the professional world (Virginia Tech Magazine)

I loved writing this story about four awesome people, alumni of both the NRV Roller Girls & Virginia Tech. Stephanie Beeman, Kacey Huntington Cappallo, Tori Elmore & Jen Stern are killing it in their professional lives and on the track as derby skaters.

They inspire me and encapsulate what I love about roller derby.

Read the story at Virginia Tech Magazine.

How Roanoke reinvented itself by bringing housing to a fading downtown (CityLab)

In 1979, Roanoke was a blue-collar New South city built around the Norfolk & Western railroad. The city core was decaying as businesses and residents moved outward to suburbs and adjacent counties.

Today, the Star City has become what so many cities of its size, geography, and history want to be. It’s burgeoning, chock full of craft beer, and eminently welcoming to outdoorsy Millennials. As small cities struggle to retain young people, Roanoke is attracting them.

How did this happen? And what does downtown’s transformation mean for nearby neighborhoods like historic Gainsboro?

Read the full story at CityLab.